Medical Marijuana Qualifying Conditions by State

While cannabis remains illegal at the federal level, states have been given the latitude to implement their own marijuana laws. A majority of states now support the medicinal use of marijuana for certain conditions approved by each individual state. Some restrict medical marijuana use to only non-psychoactive CBD oil, while others permit full-plant utilization.

Select the state below for a list of qualifying conditions and information.

View Your State Laws

Alabama does not currently have a medical marijuana program in place.

‘Carly’s Law’ was signed by Gov. Robert Bentley on Apr. 1, 2014. Named after three-year-old Carly Chandler, the law made Alabama the second state to legalize CBD oil. Alabama’s Senate voted unanimously to support SB 174 on Mar. 11, 2014.

Sponsored by Republican Sen. Paul Sanford, the bill calls for the University of Alabama to perform research into the efficacy of cannibidiol in the treatment of neurological conditions, including epilepsy. The university would only be allowed to prescribe the oil to approved patients.

View Alabama state laws.

To become a medical marijuana patient in Alaska, you must have one of the following conditions:

  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic Pain
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Nausea
  • Seizures/Epilepsy

Reciprocity: 

Alaska does not recognize medical marijuana cards issued by other states, but any visitor 21 and older with a valid ID can legally purchase cannabis products.

View Alaska’s state law page.

Qualifying conditions for becoming a medical marijuana patient in Arizona include:

  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Nausea
  • Persistent Muscle Spasms
  • PTSD
  • Seizures

Reciprocity: 

Out-of-state medical marijuana registration is recognized by the state for possession purposes only. Visiting patients may not purchase from AZ dispensaries.

View Arizona’s state law page.

Arkansas medical marijuana laws allow registered qualifying patients to obtain, use, and possess cannabis to treat their conditions. Patients must have a physician’s written certification that they have been diagnosed with a debilitating condition and would likely benefit from the use of marijuana.

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Cachexia or Wasting Syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Chronic or Debilitating Disease
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intractable Pain
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Seizures
  • Severe Arthritis
  • Severe Nausea
  • Severe and Persistent Muscle Spasms
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Ulcerative Colitis
  • Any other medical condition or its treatment approved by the Department of Health

Reciprocity:

Visiting patients must fill out a form and provide proof of patient status in their home state to purchase medical marijuana in Arkansas.

View Arkansas state law page.

It is easier to get medicinal cannabis in California than in any other state. Qualifying conditions for becoming a patient in the Golden State include:

  • Anorexia
  • Arthritis
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic Pain
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Glaucoma
  • Migraine
  • Persistent Muscle Spasms
  • Severe Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Any debilitating illness where the medical use of marijuana has been “deemed appropriate and has been recommended by a physician”

Reciprocity: 

CA welcomes adults 21 years and older with a valid driver’s license or state ID to purchase marijuana products for personal use.

View California’s state law page.

Despite the fact that cannabis is legally available in Colorado for any use, the state still operates a medicinal marijuana system for valid patients. Medical patients in The Centennial State must pay the standard sales tax, but are exempt from the additional excise and state taxes that apply to recreational sales.

Qualifying conditions for medical marijuana in Colorado include:

  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Chronic nervous system disorders
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Nausea
  • Persistent Muscle Spasms
  • Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome
  • Seizures

Reciprocity:

All adults 21 and over with a valid government-issued ID can purchase products from a recreational dispensary.

View Colorado’s state law page.

Qualifying medical marijuana patients in Connecticut must have one of the following conditions.

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Complex regional pain syndrome
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Intractable spasticity
  • Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Post-surgical back pain with a condition called chronic radiculopathy
  • Post laminectomy syndrome
  • Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Severe psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Terminal Illness Requiring End-Of-Life Care
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder
  • Other medical conditions may be approved by the Department of Consumer Protection

View Connecticut’s state law page.

Delaware supports patients with a medical marijuana program and possession of small amounts is decriminalized for all residents 18 years and older.

Qualifying conditions for medical marijuana in Delaware include:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intractable epilepsy
  • Nausea
  • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
  • Seizures
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms
  • Terminal illness

Reciprocity: 

Delaware does not participate in reciprocity agreements with other states.

View Delaware’s state law page.

Medical marijuana patients in the District of Columbia must either have one of the conditions listed below, or another condition diagnosed as “debilitating” by a licensed physician.

  • Any debilitating condition as recommended by a D.C. licensed doctor

Reciprocity:

Certain states qualify for reciprocity in D.C., view the list of states here.

View DC’s state law page.

Florida currently permits only the use of high CBD/low THC cannabis extracts, as well as a legal defense for the medicinal use of low-THC marijuana. Qualifying conditions include:

  • ALS
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Chronic nonmalignant pain*
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • PTSD
  • Seizures
  • Terminal illness (patients diagnosed with no more than 12-months to live)
  • Other debilitating medical conditions comparable to those enumerated*Defined as “pain that is either caused by or originates from a qualifying medical condition”

Reciprocity:

Florida dispensaries do not accept out-of-state patients, but the state allows dual-residents to apply for registry cards.

View Florida’s state law page.

Georgia’s medical cannabis laws permit only the use of CBD oil that is low in THC (less than 5% THC). To become a medical marijuana patient, you must have one of the following conditions:

  • AIDS
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Autism
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Hospice care patients
  • Intractable pain
  • Mitochondrial disease
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-traumatic stress syndrome
  • Peripheral neuropathy
  • Seizure disorder
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Tourette’s syndrome

View Georgia’s state law page.

Residents of the islands with a qualifying condition can register with the Medical Cannabis Registry Program to legally purchase and/or grow marijuana under the statutes of the law. Qualifying conditions for medical marijuana in Hawaii include:

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Lupus
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Severe nausea or pain
  • Persistent muscle spasms
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Seizures

Reciprocity:

Visitors who are registered patients in another state can purchase marijuana from dispensaries if they have a qualifying condition accepted by Hawaii’s program.

View Hawaii’s state law page.

Indiana passed a CBD law allowing the use of cannabis extracts with less than .3% THC, when recommended by a physician to aid a state-approved qualifying condition.

  • Treatment-resistant epileptic conditions, including Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

View Indiana state laws.

CBD oil is not yet legal in Idaho. A bill which would have allowed parents to possess up to 32 fluid ounces of liquid cannabidiol oil for the treatment of seizure disorders was vetoed by Gov. Butch Otter in 2015.

The governor has said he will issue an executive order requiring the state’s Department of Health and Welfare to study the efficacy of CBD oil on the treatment of epilepsy.

View Idaho state laws.

In Illinois, you can qualify for marijuana with any of the following conditions.

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Arnold Chiari malformation
  • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Causalgia
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
  • Complex regional pain syndrome type 2
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Dystonia
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Fibrous dysplasia
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Hydromyelia
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • Lupus
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Myasthenia Gravis
  • Myoclonus
  • Nail patella syndrome
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-traumatic stress
  • Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD)
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Spinal cord disease
  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA)
  • Syringomyelia
  • Tarlov cysts
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Traumatic brain injury and post-concussion syndrome

View Illinois’ state law page.

Iowa allows only the use of high-CBD marijuana extracts with less than 0.3% THC. There is only one condition for which cannabis is recommended.

  • AIDS/HIV
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Cancer
  • Cancer-related chronic pain, nausea, or cachexia
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Intractable epilepsy
  • Terminal illness
  • Untreatable pain

View Iowa’s state law page.

Kansas has legalized cannabidiol (CBD) by exempting it from the state’s definition of marijuana. This makes it legal to possess and sell CBD in accordance with state licensing laws.

View Kansas state laws.

Kentucky permits the use of low-THC cannabis oil, but access is highly limited. Only those taking part in a clinical trial or expanded access program can legally possess it.

  • Intractable epilepsy

View Kentucky’s state law page.

Qualifying conditions for medical marijuana patients in Louisiana include:

  • Autism spectrum disorders
  • Cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intractable pain (defined as “pain so chronic or severe as to otherwise warrant an opiate prescription”)
  • Muscular dystrophy
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post traumatic stress disorder
  • Seizure disorders/spasticity
  • Severe muscle spasms

View Louisiana’s state law page.

To qualify for medical marijuana in Maine, you must have one of the following conditions:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Nausea
  • Nail-patella syndrome
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Any condition for which a physician recommends cannabis therapy

View Maine’s state law page.

Qualifying medical marijuana patients in Maryland must have one of the following conditions:

  • Cachexia, Anorexia, or Wasting Syndrome
  • Chronic Pain
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Severe or persistent muscle spasms

View Maryland’s state law page.

In Massachusetts, the qualifying conditions for becoming a medical marijuana patient include:

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Hepatitis C
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Other conditions as determined in writing by a qualifying patient’s physician

View Massachusetts’ state law page.

To qualify as a medical cannabis patient in Michigan, you must have one of the following conditions:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Arthritis
  • Austism
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Colitis
  • Chronic pain
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease
  • Hepatitis C
  • Nail patella
  • Nausea
  • Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Parkinson’s
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Seizures
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Ulcerative colitis

View Michigan’s state law page.

Smoking cannabis is banned for medicinal purposes in Minnesota; patients can only receive a 30-day supply of edibles, oils or concentrates. You must have one of the following conditions to qualify:

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
  • Autism
  • Cancer/cachexia
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Intractable pain
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Seizures
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms
  • Sleep apnea
  • Terminal illness
  • Tourette’s Syndrome

View Minnesota’s state law page.

Medical marijuana access in Mississippi is limited to non-intoxicating CBD oil. Qualifying conditions include:

  • Debilitating epileptic seizure disorders

View Mississippi’s state law page.

CBD oil is the only form of medical marijuana available to Missouri patients. To qualify for it, you must have the following condition:

  • Intractable epilepsy

View Missouri’s state law page.

Qualifying medicinal marijuana patients in Montana must have one of the following conditions:

  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Nausea
  • Seizures
  • Severe or persistent muscle spasms

View Montana’s state law page.

Qualifying conditions for medical marijuana patients in Nevada include:

  • AIDS
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Glaucoma
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Persistent muscle spasms or seizures
  • Severe nausea or pain
  • Other conditions are subject to approval

View Nevada’s state law page.

In New Hampshire, patients must have one of the following conditions to qualify for medical marijuana:

  • ALS
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chemotherapy induced anorexia
  • Chronic Pain
  • Chronic pancreatitis
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome
  • Elevated intraocular pressure
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C (currently receiving antiviral treatment)
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Lupus
  • Moderate to severe vomiting
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Nausea
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Persistent muscle spasms
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Seizures
  • Severe pain (that has not responded to previously prescribed medication)
  • Spinal cord injury or disease
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Wasting syndrome

View New Hampshire’s state law page.

Qualifying medical marijuana patients in New Jersey must have one of the following conditions:

  • Addiction substitute therapy for opioid reduction*
  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Anxiety*
  • Cancer (includes associated chronic pain and/or severe nausea)
  • Chronic pain related to musculoskeletal disorders*
  • Chronic visceral pain*
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS (includes associated chronic pain and/or severe nausea)
  • Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
  • Migraines*
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Muscular Dystrophy
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Seizure and/or spasticity disorders
  • Tourette’s syndrome*
  • Any terminal illness if a doctor has determined the patient will die within a year

View New Jersey state law page.

Qualifying conditions to for medical marijuana patients in New Mexico include:

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Anorexia/cachexia
  • Arthritis
  • Cancer
  • Cervical dystonia
  • Chronic pain
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hospice patients
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Intractable nausea/vomiting
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Painful peripheral neuropathy
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Spinal cord damage

View New Mexico’s state law page.

Medical marijuana patients in New York must have one of the following conditions:

  • Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Epilepsy
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Parkinson’s Disease
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Neuropathies
  • Opioid substitution
  • Spinal cord damage

View New York’s state law page.

CBD oil is the only form of medical marijuana available in North Carolina. Qualifying conditions include:

  • Intractable epilepsy

View North Carolina’s state law page.

North Dakota signed a medical marijuana bill into law in 2016, although the program is not yet operational.

View North Dakota state laws.

Ohio’s medical marijuana law, signed in 2016, is not yet operational.

View Ohio state laws.

The decision to recommend medical marijuana is solely up to the treating physician.

View Oklahoma’s state law page.

Qualifying medical marijuana patients in Oregon must have one of the following conditions:

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Nausea
  • Persistent muscle spasms
  • Post-traumatic stress
  • Seizures
  • Other conditions are subject to approval

View Oregon’s state law page.

The extensive list of qualifying conditions for medical marijuana in Pennsylvania includes:

  • ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease)
  • Autism
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Dyskinetic/spastic movement disorders
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Intractable seizures
  • Intractable spasticity
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Opioid dependency
  • Neurodegenerative disorders
  • Neuropathies
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Severe chronic or intractable pain
  • Terminal illness (defined as 12 months or fewer to live)

View Pennsylvania’s state law page.

  • Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Chronic pain
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Nausea
  • Persistent muscle spasms
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Seizures
  • Other conditions are subject to approval

View Rhode Island’s state law page.

South Carolina permits only the use of CBD oil, and it is provided only in the following circumstances:

  • Dravet Syndrome
  • Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome
  • Refractory epilepsy

View South Carolina’s state law page.

Medical marijuana is not currently legal in South Dakota but will become legal on July 1, 2021 due to Measure 26 being passed.

View South Dakota state laws.

CBD oil is the only form of cannabis available to patients in Tennessee. Qualifying conditions for becoming a patient include:

  • Intractable seizures

View Tennessee’s state law page.

Texas is another state that allows only the use of CBD oil. Qualifying conditions for becoming a medical marijuana patient include:

  • Intractable epilepsy

View Texas’ state law page.

CBD oil is the only cannabis preparation allowed in Utah. In order to qualify for it as a patient, you must have the following condition:

  • Intractable epilepsy
  • Terminally ill patients

View Utah’s state law page.

Qualifying medical marijuana patients in Vermont must have one of the following conditions:

  • Any patient receiving hospice care
  • Cachexia or wasting syndrome
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease (effective July 1, 2017)
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease (effective July 1, 2017)
  • PTSD (effective July 1, 2017)
  • Seizures
  • Severe or chronic pain
  • Severe nausea

View Vermont’s state law page.

Virginia passed CBD legislation that prevents patients from being prosecuted for the medicinal use of CBD oil.

View Virginia state law page.

Qualifying conditions for medical marijuana patients in Washington include the following:

  • Cachexia
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV or AIDS
  • Intractable pain
  • Persistent muscle spasms, and/or spasticity
  • Nausea
  • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  • Seizures
  • Traumatic Brain Injury
  • Any “terminal or debilitating condition”

View Washington’s state law page.

A comprehensive medical marijuana law has been signed in by Gov. Jim Justice, although the new program is not yet operational. The Bureau of Public Health will begin to issue marijuana patient ID cards on July 1, 2019.

Qualifying Conditions:

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
  • Cancer
  • Crohn’s disease
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Epilepsy
  • Huntington’s disease
  • Intractable seizures
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Neuropathies (chronic nerve pain)
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder
  • Severe chronic or intractable pain
  • Spinal cord damage
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Terminally illness

View West Virginia state law page.

Wisconsin limits medicinal cannabis use to non-psychoactive CBD oil. Qualifying conditions include:

  • Seizure disorders
  •  Any “medical condition” for which a physician recommends it.

View Wisconsin’s state law page.

Wyoming allows only the use of low-THC CBD oil. Qualifying conditions include:

  • Intractable epilepsy

View Wyoming’s state law page.